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MEKONE
11-04-2010, 08:28 PM
I'm not sure if you guys know about this yet but Endo has released Generic Opana/Oxymorphone IR. This month when the pharmacist filled my script he gave me the Generic form instead of the regular one that I get.
The Bottle that it comes in looks exactly the same as the one that I usually get except that it has red ink on it instead of the blue ink.
The pills themselves are the same color as before but have different markings on them (Generic has a big 10 on it).
I also noted that on the bottom of the bottle it says "ENDO GENERIC PRODUCTS".
I would like to know what makes this a "Generic" formula?
IMO it has to be something because the price was $5.00 instead of the usual $20.00 that I pay. I've been looking through the booklet that it came with but I can't find anything different.Any thoughts on this???

digby
11-05-2010, 12:29 AM
They started putting them out in January of this year according to their company reports. I haven't seen them at my local pharmacies yet though. Maybe next month, as they seem to be starting to show up a few places. The generics have E795 printed on them rather than the usual E613.

Tell us how you think the generics compare to the brand if you don't mind. You would think being the same company they would be exactly the same, but who knows. The inactives are exactly the same, unfortunately including the same cornstarch, but they should be fine I would think.

duck
11-05-2010, 12:31 AM
Generics aren't necessarily cheaper because of lesser quality ingredients/methods...a generic has a fraction of the legal, capital, r&d investment etc as a pioneering name brand

Woody Bear
11-05-2010, 12:15 PM
Generics and brand name drugs both have exactly the same amount of active drug inside. But because of the different fillers, and how much pressure is used to press the pills together, different brands can take longer to break down in your gut.

So some brands will not feel as strong but will last longer, others will inititally feel stronger, but then not last as long. But if you crush the pills into a powder and take them orally, then you won't be able to notice.

If a brand has more pill binders, then the pill will contain more powder, but the same amount of drug as the other brands, so the drug will be more diluted. So if you snort a brand that has a lot of pill binders then it will feel weaker, even though it contains the same amount of drug as other brands.

Same applys with shooting. When you prepare a shot the drug solution sticks to the spoon and the undissolved solids. The more undissolved solids in the spoon, the less solution you'll get in the syringe when you draw up the shot. So brands with a lot of pill binder powder will feel weaker if you shoot them, even though they contain exactly the same amount of drug as the brand name pills.

This is why when you're preparing a shot, it's important to not add all the water at once, instead add about 3/4 of the water, then draw it up, and add the last 1/4 of the water to suck up the rest of the shot. It's way more efficient this way, because the 2nd cooking extracts the drug that clings to the cooker and pill powder, that gets left behind if you only do one cooking.

duck
11-05-2010, 12:20 PM
Generics and brand name drugs both have exactly the same amount of active drug inside. But because of the different fillers, and how much pressure is used to press the pills together, different brands can take longer to break down in your gut.

So some brands will not feel as strong but will last longer, others will inititally feel stronger, but then not last as long. But if you crush the pills into a powder and take them orally, then you won't be able to notice.

If a brand has more pill binders, then the pill will contain more powder, but the same amount of drug as the other brands, so the drug will be more diluted. So if you snort a brand that has a lot of pill binders then it will feel weaker, even though it contains the same amount of drug as other brands.

Same applys with shooting. When you prepare a shot the drug solution sticks to the spoon and the undissolved solids. The more undissolved solids in the spoon, the less solution you'll get in the syringe when you draw up the shot. So brands with a lot of pill binder powder will feel weaker if you shoot them, even though they contain exactly the same amount of drug as the brand name pills.

This is why when you're preparing a shot, it's important to not add all the water at once, instead add about 3/4 of the water, then draw it up, and add the last 1/4 of the water to suck up the rest of the shot. It's way more efficient this way, because the 2nd cooking extracts the drug that clings to the cooker and pill powder, that gets left behind if you only do one cooking.

Jersey_EMT has posted very good sources that contradict this. I would link you to them if I wasn't on my phone....but the gist of it was that pharm companies have a range they must comply to, e.g. +/-1% or something, and generics can have looser ranges, or something like that.

It's always been an interesting discussion.

MEKONE
11-05-2010, 02:45 PM
Tell us how you think the generics compare to the brand if you don't mind.
Even though this is only day 2 with them.........I PERSONALLY DON'T LIKE THEM!!!
OK first off my tolerance is pretty high so I'm not going to compare how many brand names to how many Generics.However,I rail my O's and IMO they seem to have a VERY different/nasty taste compared to the Brand names.
I also noticed that they take a bit longer to kick in,like said above they seem almost to be "Watered Down".
I'm gona roll with these for the month but will be paying the $20.00 next month.If I notice anything else or change my mind for any reason about them I'll post a update.
Anyone else get scripted these?

digby
11-05-2010, 03:03 PM
I'm still getting scripted brand Opana IR, but holding my breath. My insurance will force me to go generic once they are available everywhere so if they are bad, I may have to consider changing to something else. I have no idea what though. Thanks for the report, although perhaps not the best news.

Woody Bear
11-05-2010, 06:10 PM
Jersey_EMT has posted very good sources that contradict this. I would link you to them if I wasn't on my phone....but the gist of it was that pharm companies have a range they must comply to, e.g. +/-1% or something, and generics can have looser ranges, or something like that.
It's always been an interesting discussion.
No, that's not right. Generics and Brand drugs have to have the same amount. Your right that there's a range, because of the way pills are made you can't expect every 5 mg pill to contain exactly 5.000 mg drug per tablet, some are always going to have slightly more and some are going to have slightly less. So there are set limits and these apply to both generic and brand name drugs.

People have this idea that pharmaceutical companies selling generics will deliberately stick 4.9 mg in tablets suppose to contain 5 mg in order to make more money, but that's just a junkie myth, it's not how pharmaceuticals are made.

MEKONE
11-05-2010, 09:08 PM
People have this idea that pharmaceutical companies selling generics will deliberately stick 4.9 mg in tablets suppose to contain 5 mg in order to make more money
Personally,I'm not saying this at all.What I am saying though is that prehaps due to a change in other stuff that they may have put in there it may effect how the "Goods" react.
Like I said B4,I find this to taste VERY different,have a "delayed reaction", and even though I have a nice size tolerance,the effects from brand names which I had just taken 4 days ago lasted much longer than these.
The only thing that I am thankful for is that at least it doesn't have the gelling factor.