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euphoricontin17
12-09-2009, 07:05 PM
Hey all, I recently ran out of clean spikes and am currently unable to get more. Luckily I saved all 100 of them in a bag and am reusing the one by one so each one will then be used twice. I figure thats better tha useing ONE like 5 times.

The reason for this post is because I am extremely conscious about harm reduction and wanted to see if the procedure I am using is legit enough that you guys think it won't lead to infection. First what I do is I rinse the entire syringe (take the plunger out as well) under hot water, I then draw up 91% isopropyl into barrel and make sure the syringe and needle are completely immersed for at least 30 seconds. I then empty the alcohol out and re-rinse them in near-boiling water.

Do you think this is enough pre-caution to avoid infection/kill bacteria? If not any advice is great!

duck
12-09-2009, 07:15 PM
man I wish I had a needle in my arm right now


For me, yeah that would be enough. I'm no doctor, but I do always use clean stuff and clean with alcohol prior to injection. I've yet to have a problem * SWIM rolls up sleeve and checks injection site -- yep, looks healthy*

Ickyuck
12-09-2009, 08:11 PM
If you are super paranoid (which is a good thing) about germy already-been-used syringes, especially if they are old, try using bleach.
Just draw it up, shake a bit if needed, let it sit for about 30 secs. Then clean the hell out of it with water!

Alcohol is just fine too. If I'm re-using mine, I usually use alcohol between sessions if its not an old point.

(I'm a bit fucked up, sory if this is a non-sensical post)

Thanat0s
12-09-2009, 08:44 PM
if just yer own old rigs
bleach /alk/water flush is ok

but if you register a lot
and esp with tar or pills
old rigs always have a bacteria filled
goo stuck in the needle

try taking week old used once rig
and press plunger REALY hard
at 0units

youll squirt out something
u dont wnna be shooting

so be sure clear the spike too
if reusing rigs more than a few hours old.


hr?

JonnyM
12-09-2009, 09:55 PM
http://i49.tinypic.com/10h4rgg.jpg

duck
12-09-2009, 10:04 PM
And on a similar note, it's fucking retarded we can't get clean needles EVERYWHERE. I tell ya what, a dirty needle rarely prevents injection.

squareone
12-09-2009, 10:52 PM
And on a similar note, it's fucking retarded we can't get clean needles EVERYWHERE. I tell ya what, a dirty needle rarely prevents injection.
No needle does though. lol.

paroxetina
12-09-2009, 11:12 PM
When I was in an inpatient (adolescent) psychiatric hospital, we had a daily AODA (alcohol and other drug abuse) group. At the time, I was 13 and had never done drugs, so it was pretty much a waste for me, and I don't remember much about it.

What I do remember is being told that IF you were going to reuse/share syringes, you should draw bleach into the syringe and shoot it out three times, followed by flushing it out three times with water the same method. I think the reason this stuck with me, despite being irrelevant to my life experiences at that time, is that I couldn't imagine it was fully effective as a disinfectant, nor completely safe. Surely small traces of bleach would still make it into your veins?

Anyway, I'm NOT recommending this method, just curious what other people think about it. This was 1997, for what it's worth.

jcmanny
12-10-2009, 04:45 AM
As someone who has been sick from re-using rigs I'd try harder to get new syringes. I'm going on week three of being worn down tired even though I'm near the end of my antibiotic treatment. My veins feel a little better but I still have pain and burning.

Be safe, I wish I had taken the time to drive to the store or my friend's house to score new rigs. Hopefully I didn't pick up anything other than a vein infection.

nick
12-10-2009, 04:52 AM
When I was in an inpatient (adolescent) psychiatric hospital, we had a daily AODA (alcohol and other drug abuse) group. At the time, I was 13 and had never done drugs, so it was pretty much a waste for me, and I don't remember much about it.

What I do remember is being told that IF you were going to reuse/share syringes, you should draw bleach into the syringe and shoot it out three times, followed by flushing it out three times with water the same method. I think the reason this stuck with me, despite being irrelevant to my life experiences at that time, is that I couldn't imagine it was fully effective as a disinfectant, nor completely safe. Surely small traces of bleach would still make it into your veins?

Anyway, I'm NOT recommending this method, just curious what other people think about it. This was 1997, for what it's worth.

The effaciousness of bleach is hotly debated.A recent reputable report suggests it's much more effective than anyone thought.

I'd always advise using clean works not just because of infection but also the damage injecting with old syringes does to the veins.However bleach is better than nothing.

candy
12-10-2009, 10:04 AM
Bleaching your needles is safe and it is effective for killing most bacteria, but it will not kill
the Hepatitis C virus.

Remember to also keep all of your equipment clean that you use to inject with. Using clean needles is a great way to avoid infection
and abscesses, but not keeping the rest of your equipment clean can also lead to infection.

More Feen
12-10-2009, 01:14 PM
Remember that if you are using alcohol (ethanol or isopropyl) to let the alcohol dry naturally after you've finished flushing your rigs.

I think that it is the time during which the alcohol evaporates that does much of the bacteria killing.

People that blow on the alcohol to get it to go away quicker are defeating the purpose of using alcohol.

This goes for wiping the injection site as well. I'm impatient, I start fanning the site with my hand, and nursey says: "Do no do that! Now me & me got to wipe it down again."

If using bleach, make sure to rise with hot water (will deactivate the bleach). If you are diluting the bleach before cleaning your rigs, use colder water only (because hot water will d/a it).

So I'ms tolds,

M F

Chemical_Boy
12-10-2009, 08:13 PM
I just have to say that the title of this thread was enough to creep me out.

At least you were referring to your own pins. I used to know cats in Jersey who would buy points in Newark when they would go to cop and then come home and boil/bleach them.

Fuck it would creep me out.... I snorted all my shit- no way I would stick a spike that has been in some HIV+, crack whore junky's arm in my body no matter how much processing I had done.


Anyhow.... I know this is bad, but with my own spikes, I just run super hot water through them a few times and give it a good final rinse. But I always rinse out my rig post-shot too. Not that this matters.... I am sure I am asking for infection.

If I am really concerned about the spike I would push hot and soapy water through it a bunch of times. But even this is probably half-assed.

One time I did not rinse the soap out well enough and I tasted soap when I pushed the shot:D

erica
12-10-2009, 11:11 PM
I was reading a recent study the other day that a harm-reduction organization did on the best way to clean syringes, if you absolutely must reuse them. They tested a ton of different methods, and the most effective was to simply fill the entire barrel with bleach, squirt it out, and repeat for a total of twice per syringe. Rinse with clean water fo course. It eliminated all germs in over 99% of the syringes every time. They said you don't have to worry about shaking it or even leaving the bleach in there for more time than it takes to suck it up and squirt it out - it doesn't make any difference in effectiveness. I can try to find the link if you're interested - they also had a video.

Tylercwxzy
12-17-2009, 03:23 PM
What about the inbetween spot in the needle and the syringe(little plastic area with pin leading to syringe)? There is dried blood (very small amount) in that spot and I cannot for the life of me get it out, used a mix of bleach and alcohol w/water several times. I just need to clean that little spot or I won't use it.

candy
12-17-2009, 03:59 PM
What about the inbetween spot in the needle and the syringe(little plastic area with pin leading to syringe)? There is dried blood (very small amount) in that spot and I cannot for the life of me get it out, used a mix of bleach and alcohol w/water several times. I just need to clean that little spot or I won't use it.

I really cannot give you any advice or proven method to remove dried old blood, except to dispose of that syringe, especially if it is not your syringe.

Alcohol is not a good idea if you plan on re-using your syringes. Alcohol can damage the rubber end on the plunger and make it difficult to use.

Being realistic, it is not always possible for people to get new syringes and knowing how to properly disinfect them will help reduce the incidence of infections.

To disinfect syringes, follow the steps below:

1. Fill syringe with clean water. Tap the syringe to remove any particles and continue to rinse through until
you do not see any more blood or particles.

2. Fill the syringe completely with bleach and let it stand for 30 seconds and waste it by shooting it through the needle.

3. Rinse with clean water to remove bleach by shooting clean water through the needle. This can be repeated a few times to remove all the bleach.

The steps above are the same steps recommended by the CDC and taught by Needle Exchanges.
You should really follow all these steps to reduce your chances of infection.


And remember that all the equipment you share should be cleaned as well. This goes for cookers and even straws you may share. There is evidence that HIV and Hep C can be transmitted by sharing straws, especially Hep C.


Research has been done to show that peer education has been an effective method of harm reduction.
One friend sharing information with another and so on.
But information is the only thing you should be sharing. If you do make the choice to use syringes given to you by someone else, clean them yourself. Don't just take someone's word!

oneironaut
12-17-2009, 04:42 PM
i rinse with hot water, put in iso and let it sit overnight. i fill it up to the top with iso that way when i put the orange lid back on i can squeeze 10-15 units in and give the spike something to sit in, then before i use i rinse one more time with hot water. i don't like to reuse but sometimes its unavoidable, but i wouldn't do it more that twice like you said, too dull.

Woody Bear
12-17-2009, 06:38 PM
Hot water coagulates the blood into a clump. So you should use cold water to rinse the syringe out before the bleach wash. After the bleach wash, using hot water shouldn't matter. But you definitely want to rinse the syringe out with cold water rather then hot at the start.

It's the same with washing clothes. If you get blood on your clothes, soak them in cold water, as this gets the blood out. If you use hot water on blood soaked clothes, then the blood will set, and you'll never get the stain out.

Indy
12-17-2009, 08:44 PM
Bleaching your needles is safe and it is effective for killing most bacteria, but it will not kill
the Hepatitis C virus.

Remember to also keep all of your equipment clean that you use to inject with. Using clean needles is a great way to avoid infection
and abscesses, but not keeping the rest of your equipment clean can also lead to infection.

You're the medical professional and I don't mean to argue, but I seem to recall reading that bleach will kill MOST hep C MOST of the time, just not always. I'll see if I can find it or something

erica
12-18-2009, 12:18 AM
I'd just like to add that if there is any hardened blood in the syringe, you're better off tossing it than trying any method to get it out. It's really difficult to make sure you get it all out, and even then, you're NEVER sure that it's all gone. Most likely there are many particles still in there that you wouldn't want to inject.

Ive had bits of old blood in syringes that were so hard, I'd press the plunger and the entire tip of the needle would blow off! Imagine how bad it would be if you got any of that hardened blood in your veins...yikes.

After reading about all the people who are just using isopropyl alcohol, I would like to reiterate that you should switch to bleach! Studies have shown it is far more effective.

Uncle Wiggly
12-18-2009, 01:13 AM
Every one has mentioned very good methods. I would take Candy's advice over most due to her experience in the health field and IRL. Something I don't think has been mentioned is doing some proactive cleaning.

If you know you're going to be re-using your pins, clean them out after you use them the first time. The first rinse should always be with cold water. I forget who posted it but hot water will cause blood to clot. After a few cold water rinses clean them as you would if you were going to use them immediately. Make sure they're completely dry and place them in a clean, ideally sterile, container. Of course most folks don't have sterile containers so maybe a new, unused baggie.

You'll still need to clean them when you're ready to use them again but the less chance of there being anything left in them to foster bacteria growth the better. I think.:cool: